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Is Arguing Shameful to God?

Is there a place in the Bible that says that you shouldn't argue or that it is shameful to God?

Perhaps you are thinking of Job 6:25, which states, "How forcible are right words! but what doth your arguing reprove?"

However, the Bible does not use the word argue much (besides Job 6:25, "arguments" are mentioned in Job 23:4). A more common word in the Bible is "dispute." All disputations are not bad in the Bible. Paul , when he first got saved (and was still called Saul), "spake boldly in the name of the Lord Jesus, and disputed against the Grecians" (Acts 9:29). Later, we find Paul disputing in the synagogues with the Jews (Acts 17:17; 19:8) and in the school of Tyrannus in the city of Ephesus (Acts 19:9). But these were clearly debates with those who did not know the truth of the gospel about the things of God. It was confrontational witnessing. In another incident, Paul and Barnabus "had no small dissension and disputation" (Acts 15:1-2) with some who taught the necessity of circumcision for salvation. Therefore, major doctrinal issues may be proper cause for disputation.

However, disputations among believers often take a negative turn. During the ministry of Christ, the disciples "disputed among themselves, who should be the greatest" (Matthew 9:34). Jesus rebuked them for their pride. Paul spoke against "doubtful disputations" (Romans 14:1) and commanded the Philippians: "Do all things without murmurings and disputings" (Philippians 2:14). In another place, he warned of "perverse disputings of men of corrupt minds" (1 Timothy 6:5).

The believer is commanded: "Be ye angry, and sin not: let not the sun go down upon your wrath" (Ephesians 4:26). Consider this passage:

James 1:19 Wherefore, my beloved brethren, let every man be swift to hear, slow to speak, slow to wrath:  20 For the wrath of man worketh not the righteousness of God.

Proverbs 16:32 states, "He that is slow to anger is better than the mighty; and he that ruleth his spirit than he that taketh a city." Those who argue often lose control of their spirit and that is to be avoided. So, although I know of no verse stating exactly what you ask, there are many warnings that should make the believer pause and think before he sinks in to a state of argumentation.

David Reagan
Daily Proverb

Proverbs 28:24

Whoso robbeth his father or his mother, and saith, It is no transgression; the same is the companion of a destroyer.